Photos from Pripyat near Chernobyl by Tomasz Zawadzki. More photos can be found on English Russia. Thanks to Umbrella for the heads up

Photos from Pripyat near Chernobyl by Tomasz Zawadzki. More photos can be found on English Russia. Thanks to Umbrella for the heads up

On April 26, 1986, Ukraine’s Chernobyl nuclear reactor underwent a series of explosions, leading to the deaths of 56 people and the evacuation of more than 350,000 people. It will be 900 years before the area is safe to live in again. Strangely, though, Chernobyl and the surrounding radiation zone have become an increasingly popular tourist attraction, which Ukraine plans to open up to visitors in 2011.
Here: A gas mask lies near a doll at a kindergartens in the ghost city of Pripyat, a town deserted since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, and once home to 30,000.
From Life’s Tumblr page.
More photos of the Chernobyl site can be found in Life’s profile, Chernobyl: Unlikely Tourist Spot

On April 26, 1986, Ukraine’s Chernobyl nuclear reactor underwent a series of explosions, leading to the deaths of 56 people and the evacuation of more than 350,000 people. It will be 900 years before the area is safe to live in again. Strangely, though, Chernobyl and the surrounding radiation zone have become an increasingly popular tourist attraction, which Ukraine plans to open up to visitors in 2011.

Here: A gas mask lies near a doll at a kindergartens in the ghost city of Pripyat, a town deserted since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, and once home to 30,000.

From Life’s Tumblr page.

More photos of the Chernobyl site can be found in Life’s profile, Chernobyl: Unlikely Tourist Spot

Image from Trey Ratcliff’s account of visiting Chernobyl. It’s worth checking out his blog entry here.

Image from Trey Ratcliff’s account of visiting Chernobyl. It’s worth checking out his blog entry here.